Heaven freshly made and authentic – Appam

  • Heaven freshly made and authentic
  • Rating: 3
  • Reviewed by:
  • On 03/09/2013
  • Last modified:18/04/2014

Review Summary:

We ordered the eggs and cheese version of the Appam, the Appam lose it crispiness relatively fast in our humid environment, so do consume as soon as possible. Quite a numbers of customers ordered take away packs and we just wondered how it tasted without the crispiness. Both the Appam we ordered were charred at the bottom and became bitter, maybe the stall owner was overwhelmed by the crowd and lost focus on the quality. The Appam by itself might have been too plain to our liking and we had to eat with brown sugar and shredded coconut. Overall, we were somehow disappointed with the much over-hyped of the Appam, though we appreciate the time consuming making process, we think it might not be worth with the one hour wait.

Heaven freshly made and authentic – Appam

Appam is a pancake made with fermented rice batter and coconut milk, a popular staple food in the South Indian states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu.  Before you order the food, learn the right pronunciation first, Appam is not pronounced as “Ap pang” “Ap pan” but “Ap pom”. None of the few customers ahead of us in the queue got it right until we heard the conversation between the stall helpers! “Ap pom”, two, one egg and one cheese”.

appam2

Appam is the term used for a baked dessert, making Appam is a slow and tedious process. You first need to scoop one to two spoonful of flour mixture and evenly spread it in the metal mini wok with lid, lift up the wok and turn it around to ensure even coating of the flour. After a few minutes of heating and baking on the stove, different toppings e.g. cheese, butter or eggs were then added to the Appam. Once right crispiness is attained, the Appam is ready to serve. We waited for an hour for our Appam not due to long queue but the slow preparation process!

Heaven freshly made and authentic – Appam

So how should the Appam be eaten? It can be eaten on its own, however some prefer to go with brown sugar and shredded coconut as it is slightly sour. You can eat it with curry as well.

appam3

We ordered the eggs and cheese version of the Appam, the Appam lose it crispiness relatively fast in our humid environment, so do consume as soon as possible. Quite a numbers of customers ordered take away packs and we just wondered how it tasted without the crispiness. Both the Appam we ordered were charred at the bottom and became bitter, maybe the stall owner was overwhelmed by the crowd and lost focus on the quality. The Appam by itself might have been too plain to our liking and we had to eat with brown sugar and shredded coconut.appam5

Overall, we were somehow disappointed with the much over-hyped of the Appam, though we appreciate the time consuming making process, we think it might not be worth with the one hour wait.

The stall does sell freshly made Puttu Mayam, chicken curry and mutton curry as well. We tried their freshly made Puttu Mayam, and let’s put it in this way, Puttu Mayam probably is one of the last food that you want to eat fresh or hot from the steamer, since a freshly made Puttu Mayam was simply too soggy and lacked of the much needed chewy or QQ texture compared to those off the shelve, an important factor for a good Puttu Mayam to us.

Puttu Mayam 1

Heaven freshly made and authentic

Address: Bedok Market Place – Kampung@Simpang Bedok

Level 2, #02-08, Bedok Market Place Food Centre

348 Bedok Road, 469560 Singapore

Operating Hours: Lunch till Dinner

(Please take note Bedok Market Place has just closed for business and appreciate if you can help to update us their new location if available)

 

3 COMMENTS

  1. Deepu,

    Understand that Singapore south Indian food is very different to actual south Indian tamil / kerala food.

    Here somehow the quality is very bad. For example a muruku will have a lot more rice flour, and hard and fired in palm oil.

    Am not sure why Singaporean Indians make food that tastes cheap but that’s how it is. And other Singaporean races do not even have a clue about good Indian food.

    They think thin watery sambhar served as dhal curry and oily prata as Indian food unfortunately. Very small number of restaurants here make good quality Indian food and mostly expensive. Unlike the Chinese food which is good everywhere.

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