Malaysian Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa

  • Malaysian Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa
  • Rating: 4
  • Reviewed by:
  • On 09/09/2014
  • Last modified:14/09/2014

Review Summary:

Malaysian Food Street is a place for can satiating your craving for many Malaysian favorites, where you can enjoy the (almost) authentic food in a unique street food ambience. For the Singaporean who loves good Malaysian food, you don't need to cross the causeway heading up North - just head south and cross the bridge to Sentosa!

Malaysian Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa – Lured from across the causeway

The Glutton Family loves Malaysian food – from Penang Fried Kway Teow, Klang Bak Kut Teh, Malacca Chicken Rice, Prawn Noodle to the sumptuous desserts; we’re already drooling at the thought!

Now, you don’t even need to go up North for good Malaysian food: just head south to Sentosa to enjoy all the famous and delectable food from Penang, KL to Malacca – at the Malaysian Food Street @ Resorts World Sentosa.

Malaysia food street 1

We had accepted the invitation from Malaysia Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa without a second of hesitation. It was a night out to learn about frying Penang Fried Kway Teow and KL Hokkien Mee from Chef Adolf Chen and Chef Richard. (Of course, we’d be tasting the mouth-watering dishes here as well.) Not our first visit to Malaysia Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa, every trip here is always fulfilling and highly satisfying.

Malaysia Food Street 12

Photos courtesy of MFS:  Chef Adolf Chen

The hand-picked food stalls here are not the ordinary road side food stalls from Malaysia but those that are reputable and highly raved about. You’re probably familiar with Huen Kee Claypot Chicken Rice, Ah Mei’s Prawn Mee, Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee or Ah Long Lor Bak and lots more. 17 stalls selling the best of the best food from Malaysia, it is difficult not to stuff yourself silly here.

Malaysia food street 2

The classic Penang street old town scene is beautifully recreated here – but the difference is you don’t have to sweat it out, courtesy of the extra cool air from the air conditioning. Nostalgic signboards and old shop houses create an old-timey ambience to complete the Malaysian street food experience.

Malaysia food street 10

My two teens are equally excited to come here – both in fact came well prepared, my son took only a light breakfast and my daughter even skipped her lunch completely, both truly live up to the name of the Glutton family!

Ah Long Lor Bak

It was expected then that my two teens started complaining about their growling stomachs when we got there, and since we were there early, to curb their incessant demands for food, we brought them to Ah Long Lor Bak. The prawn fritter was thinly coated with flour and was really crispy and fragrant, extremely delicious and a must try here. The Lor Bak was equally good – packed with nicely seasoned meat, we liked it a lot.

Malaysia food street 3

Penang Fried Kway Teow $5.50

There was a live cooking demonstration on cooking Penang Fried Kway Teow, In less than 10 minutes, Chef Richard presented the audience a plate of aromatic Penang fried kway teow. Singapore char kway teow is usually cooked with dark and sweet sauce, while Penang char kway teow is much lighter in colour but saltier in taste. And while it was not completely like what we tasted in Penang, it was definitely close enough, and we still enjoyed it very much. This dish is a favorite of my teens’ and we just love it!

Malaysia food street 4

Ah Mei Hokkien Prawn mee $6.50

There is a distinct difference between Malaysia prawn mee and Singapore prawn mee. Malaysia prawn mee has an extra flavour – spiciness – added to the broth base. The spiciness somehow helps to neutralize the fishiness from the seafood and at the same time greatly enhances the tastiness of the broth. Hokkien prawn mee requires a tedious preparation process, where the prawn shells are actually pre-fried before being added into the broth to boil. Instead of just throwing prawn shells directly into the broth, this additional process actually helps to create a more robust prawn fragrance for the soup broth. Other ingredients like pork bones and ground dried chili are added and boiled for more than 3 hours to infuse their essence into the pot of broth.

Malaysia Food Street 11

Photos courtesy of MFS

The hot spicy broth is then poured into a bowl of white mee hoon, along with egg noodle with pork rib, hard-boiled egg, prawn, bean sprouts and Kang Kong. It was a bowl of perfectly cooked Hokkien prawn mee.

Jalan Alor KL Hokkien mee $6.50

Singapore Hokkien mee is a mixture of yellow mee and white bee hoon, fried with chicken or seafood stock with lashings of lard to create a unique flavour. KL fried Hokkien mee is substantially different, with the use of thick white round noodle (the noodle used here is specially made for MFS), stir fried with dark and light sauce, according to the owner, the secret of a good Hokkien mee is the proportion of light and dark soya sauce – key in achieving a delicate and balanced flavour. Together with fresh ingredients tossed in like shrimp, lean pork, squid and some greens, the end result is a plate of black noodles packed with a nice flavour, mixed with home-made chili belachan (shrimp paste) for an extra punch.

Malaysia Food Street 13

Photos courtesy of MFS

Malacca Chicken Rice Ball $5.00

Malacca Chicken Rice is a die die must eat local staple in every of our trip to Malacca, we’ve tried most of the famous chicken rice balls there but our favorite is still the Kadai Kopi Chung Hwa at Jonker street. Making good chicken rice balls is not an easy feat and requires a high level of skill and process control. MFS Malacca Chicken Rice Ball does not have the luxury to hand roll each rice ball due to difficulty in recruiting manpower, resorting to machines to do the work, with each rice ball perfectly made but somehow just missing the right firmness and texture that can only achieved by human hands, a compromise we just have to live with. However, the chicken was still juicy and tender but we just wished that it could have been more flavourful.

malacca chicken rice 1

Durian Chendol $4.50

Love durian and love Chendol? You can now find the best of both worlds here. Durian Chendol is a must try of this month (September 2014). The red bean was soft and the green jelly was home-made by the chefs, topped with shaved ice and drenched in thick coconut milk and Gula Malaka (Palm sugar), with a generous scoop of thick creamy durian purée, a great dessert to cap off a meal.

Malaysia food street 9

Duck Satay $13 for 10 sticks

We know there are beef satay, chicken satay, mutton satay and pork satay. But have you heard about duck satay? Yes, duck satay. Thick juicy chunks of duck meat are well marinated and barbecued over charcoal fire, paired with a specially concocted grated peanut sauce mixed with fresh pineapple purée to give it a unique zing. That’s the special for the month of October 2014 – don’t miss this unique and rarely available dish.

Malaysia food street 8

Malaysia Food Street is a place for can satiating your craving for many Malaysian favorites, where you can enjoy the (almost) authentic food in a unique street food ambience. For the Singaporean who loves good Malaysian food, you don’t need to cross the causeway heading up North – just head south and cross the bridge to Sentosa!

Add: Malaysia Food Street @ Resort World Sentosa, 8 Sentosa Gateway, The Bull Ring (next to Universal Studios), Resorts World Sentosa, 098269

Hrs: 11am – 10pm (Mon, Tue and Thurs), Closed on Wednesdays, 9am – 11pm (Fri – Sat), 9am – 10pm (Sun)

3W: http://www.rwsentosa.com

LEAVE A REPLY